PACT Notes

May 25, 2018 

High-Nicotine Dependent Smokers ‘Less Likely’ to Quit After Lung Cancer Screening
Tobacco cessation is considered the single most effective primary prevention strategy for reducing the risk of lung cancer death in patients. Researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina conducted a secondary research analysis on the National Lung Screening Trial and found that current smokers have varying levels of tobacco dependence that can help predict a person’s ability to quit and clinical outcomes. A single question within this screening tool, was associated with outcomes in this population. Specifically, those who had their first cigarette within five minutes of waking were significantly less likely to be successful in smoking cessation, significantly more likely to have lung cancer and had significantly higher rates of death. Utilizing this information can help to develop tailored tobacco treatment plans and improve risk assessment for lung cancer, which may lead to better individual and health system outcomes in the future.

Strategies to Tackle Workplace Tobacco Use
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Can Facebook Help You Quit Smoking? Study Indicates Yes
Facebook may be able to help people quit smoking, according to a UCSF study. This study used the world’s most popular social media site to recruit 500 smokers ages 18 to 25. It exposed them to messages about quitting and counseling about quitting, all through Facebook. Participants joined a private Facebook group in which they could communicate with a trained counselor through a weekly live counseling session, similar to a Reddit-style question-and-answer exchange. Researchers also created daily posts tailored to the participants’ level of interest in quitting. Researchers were particularly interested in targeting young adults because that age group does not use traditional quitting programs as often as older adults, even though the programs are accessible online and through texting services.

The University of Utah Will Become Tobacco-Free in July

Worthington, OH City Council Passes Tobacco 21 Law

PACT Notes

PACT Notes – October 19, 2018

GoErie.com reports on e-cigarette use among teens in Erie County. Use among Erie County teens has increased significantly in recent years, even though federal law prevents the sale of e-cigarettes to anyone younger than 18. About one in six students in the county — 16.6 percent — vaped at least once in the past 30 days, according to the 2017 Pennsylvania Youth Risk Behavior Survey. It’s an increase from 16 percent in the 2015 survey, the first survey that included vaping statistics. Nationally, e-cigarette use rose from 1.5 percent to 11.7 percent among high school students and from 0.6 percent to 3.3 percent among middle school students from 2011 to 2017, the Food and Drug Administration reported recently.

PACT Notes October 5, 2018

The Wolf Administration is urging teens and their parents, educators and health care providers to be aware of the dangers of vaping or using e-cigarettes as the number of teens using this method of smoking is increasing across the nation. “Most e-cigarettes contain nicotine, which is a highly addictive drug that can harm brain development, which continues until about age 25,” Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine said. “Young people who use e-cigarettes may be more likely to go on to use regular cigarettes. If you have a problem with vaping, there are resources available to help you.” The FDA, last month, declared the use of e-cigarettes among teens an “epidemic” and is taking steps to stop youth access to tobacco products. At the same time, the U.S. Surgeon General determined that e-cigarette use among youth and young adults is a public health concern.