PACT Notes

May 25, 2018 

High-Nicotine Dependent Smokers ‘Less Likely’ to Quit After Lung Cancer Screening
Tobacco cessation is considered the single most effective primary prevention strategy for reducing the risk of lung cancer death in patients. Researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina conducted a secondary research analysis on the National Lung Screening Trial and found that current smokers have varying levels of tobacco dependence that can help predict a person’s ability to quit and clinical outcomes. A single question within this screening tool, was associated with outcomes in this population. Specifically, those who had their first cigarette within five minutes of waking were significantly less likely to be successful in smoking cessation, significantly more likely to have lung cancer and had significantly higher rates of death. Utilizing this information can help to develop tailored tobacco treatment plans and improve risk assessment for lung cancer, which may lead to better individual and health system outcomes in the future.

Strategies to Tackle Workplace Tobacco Use
Want to learn more about smokefree policy? Click here.

Can Facebook Help You Quit Smoking? Study Indicates Yes
Facebook may be able to help people quit smoking, according to a UCSF study. This study used the world’s most popular social media site to recruit 500 smokers ages 18 to 25. It exposed them to messages about quitting and counseling about quitting, all through Facebook. Participants joined a private Facebook group in which they could communicate with a trained counselor through a weekly live counseling session, similar to a Reddit-style question-and-answer exchange. Researchers also created daily posts tailored to the participants’ level of interest in quitting. Researchers were particularly interested in targeting young adults because that age group does not use traditional quitting programs as often as older adults, even though the programs are accessible online and through texting services.

The University of Utah Will Become Tobacco-Free in July

Worthington, OH City Council Passes Tobacco 21 Law

PACT Notes

PACT Notes September 28, 2018

The American Lung Association expressed concern about the possible health consequences of e-cigarettes and lack of government oversight of the products. Joining Smart Talk on Wednesday to discuss e-cigarette use among youth and the public was Erika Sward, assistant vice president of national advocacy for the American Lung Association, Jennifer Hobbs Folkenroth, national senior director, tobacco, American Lung Association, Dr. Jonathan Foulds, professor of public health sciences and psychiatry at Penn State College of Medicine, and Dionne Baylor, supervisor and prevention specialist with Dauphin County Department of Drug & Alcohol Services.

PACT Notes September 21, 2018

In the latest of a series of actions to address the epidemic of youth e-cigarette use, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration launched The Real Cost Youth E-Cigarette Prevention Campaign, a new, comprehensive effort aimed at educating kids about the dangers of e-cigarettes. The campaign targets nearly 10.7 million youth, aged 12-17, who have used e-cigarettes or are open to trying them, and features hard-hitting advertising on digital and social media sites popular among teens, as well as placing posters with e-cigarette prevention messages in high schools across the nation.

PACT Notes September 14, 2018

The Veterans of Foreign Wars clubhouse in Morningside is one of hundreds of establishments in Allegheny County where state law allows people to smoke inside. Though Pennsylvania passed the Clean Indoor Air Act in 2008, there were thousands of exemptions for establishments in the hospitality industry (mostly bars). On Tuesday, Pennsylvania VFW commander Thomas Hanzes spoke at the Morningside VFW and called on state lawmakers to end the exemptions and ban smoking inside all workplaces. He says VFW members have already voted to support this step and many other posts are joining Morningside.